Everything You Wanted to Know About Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses

Everything You Wanted to Know About Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses

Indeed, small businesses are a significant part of the country’s economy. The US Small Business Administration reported that there are about 30 million small businesses in the United States, and they accumulatively employ 47.8 percent of the US workforce.

Moreover, SBA states that 9 million amongst those small businesses are categorized as veteran-owned businesses. Simultaneously, corporations realize the significance of adding service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses(SDVOSB) in their supply chains so much that the Billion Dollar Roundtable (BDR) has widened its norms for diverse companies, which are considered as the corporation’s supply chain expenses.

Learn more about what categorizes a business as SDVOSB-owned and resources that are available to certified SDVOSBs.

Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) Requirements

A service-disabled veteran-owned small business can be explained as:

  • A start-up or a small business.
  • It is 51 percent owned and controlled by one or more service-disabled veterans.
  • Includes one or more service-disabled veterans who manage everyday operations plus make long-term decisions.
  • Needing qualified veterans to have sustained their disability at their period of service.

Learn more about Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB)

Economically Disadvantaged Small Business Needs

Many lack the knowledge that the Federal Government attempts to award a minimum of 5 percent of all federal contracting dollars to small disadvantaged businesses every year via its 8(a) program. For a business to qualify for the 8(a) program, it needs to meet the following qualities:

  • A small business
  • Businesses that have not participated in the 8(a) program plus managed by US citizens who are socially and economically disadvantaged.
  • When a business is owned by someone with a total average adjusted from gross income from the last 3 years is $25000 or less.
  • Owned by an individual with $4 million or less in assets.
  • An owner that manages everyday operations as well as makes long-term decisions.
  • Business displaying all the characters of reliability.
  • Show signs of success plus able to perform successfully on contracts.

Facts about becoming certified as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business

Since SDVOSBs come under two classes: veteran-owned and disability-owned, the scopes and resources available to SDVOSBs are expanded. It should be noted that veterans come from several backgrounds. You may also be qualified for Certification as a minority-owned, women-owned, or LGBT-owned business enterprise. When you meet the requisites to be an SDVOSB, the following step is to become certified. There are two different certifications in actuality: third-party Certification and Certification (or verification) through the federal government.

Also Read: A Comprehensive Guide to Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business

It is suggested to complete both the certifications to amplify the scopes available to your business. In order to be qualified for set-aside contracts, the federal government needs to be certified via its individual process known as Vets First Verification.

Third-Party Certification offers corporate supplier diversity programs with the guarantee that a nationally recognized, the independent agency inspected your business as well as verified the veteran-owned status.

When it comes to education and training, both private and federal institutions understand the significance of supplier diversity plus invest in supplier development. If anybody is starting their business or has been around for some time, these resources can help them to succeed.